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Alpinist's Guidebooks of Mountain Ranges of British Columbia

These are updated guidebooks to these areas. They are large PDF files. For the May 24, 2017 versions, Earle says:
"The principal betterment to the Selkirk and Purcell guidebook is in the Hatteras Group, where there is a great increase in the data about the Pinnacles, and photos. There are now no less than 30 summits treated in this group. In the Cariboo and Monashee book, I now have more photos and descriptions in the Halvorson Group."

The Southernmost Selkirks and the Northernmost Purcells of British Columbia: An Alpinist’s Guide

by Earle R. Whipple and Kim Kratky

May 24, 2017

Even today, British Columbia, the most western province of Canada, is still a wilderness of mountains, valleys, glaciers, forest and plateau. The Columbia Mountains (the Interior Ranges; containing the Cariboo, Monashee, Selkirk and Purcell Ranges) all lie entirely within British Columbia, just west of the Canadian Rocky Mountains and the southern Alberta/British Columbia border.

When compared with other mountainous areas in British Columbia, the Southernmost Selkirks are especially well provided with roads.

One large, active glacier exists in this area on its highest mountain, Mount Cooper (well to the south in the Columbia Mountains) and there is good climbing on rock and snow, excellent rock climbing in the Mulvey and Prestley Groups, and the Devil’s Range, and routes for those climbers wishing easy, relaxing climbing in beautiful scenery. The Kokanee Group offers fine hiking on trails as well as climbing, and backpacking traverses have been worked out in the northern Valhallas and the northernmost Purcells. Various groups in the Columbia Mountains are famous, such as the Adamants, Sir Donald and the Bugaboos, and the above are still other attractive groups. There are beautiful lake districts in the Kokanee and Valhalla areas.


The Cariboo and Monashee Ranges of British Columbia: An Alpinist’s Guide

by Earle R. Whipple

May 24, 2017

Even today, British Columbia, the most western province of Canada, is still a wilderness of mountains, valleys, glaciers, forest and plateau. The Columbia Mountains (Interior Ranges; which contain the Cariboo, Monashee, Selkirk and Purcell Ranges) lie entirely within British Columbia, just west of the Canadian Rocky Mountains and the southern Alberta/British Columbia border. This Guide describes the access and mountaineering in this large area.

Aside from parts of the Coast Range and the northern Rockies, the Cariboo and Monashee Ranges are the most isolated in B.C. However, if one listens to the helicopters from the lodges in these ranges, when camped there, one may question this.

Large, active glaciers with spectacular icefalls exist in the mountains of the western part of the Halvorson Group, the northern Wells Gray Group, the Premier Ranges, the Dominion Group and northern Scrip Range; there is good climbing on rock, snow and ice, and routes for those climbers wishing easy, relaxing climbing in beautiful scenery. Good rock climbing on gneiss and granite is in the southern Gold Range and Mt. Begbie in the north. The Gold Range alone has more than one fifth of all the climbing information. There are also locales offering fine hiking on trails or alpine meadows (Halvorson Group, southern Wells Gray Group, southern Scrip Range, and the Shuswap Group), and backpacking traverses have been worked out through the Halvorson Group, the Dominion Group and Scrip Range, and the Gold Range. Some groups in the Columbia Mountains are famous, such as the Adamants, Sir Donald and the Bugaboos, and the above are other highly attractive groups. Beautiful lake districts exist in the northern Cariboos, and the Monashees.

The area covered by this book starts from the town of McBride, on Highway 16, southeast of Prince George, and extends south to near the border with the U.S.A., staying all the while within the great bend of the Fraser River (on the bend’s east side), and then west of Canoe Reach (lake; formerly Canoe River) and just west of the lower Columbia River south of its great bend.


Canada's 35 Greatest Hikes

by Explore Magazine

A quick glance at some of the great Canadian hikes. There really are more than 35 great Canadian hikes, but but these are a good overview.